Listening Intently

Since KMT have changed their own image into a friendlier and a more lenient one, though they may not always follow general consensus or public opinion however, they have finally learned to listen.

DPP Recommendations:

President Ma Ying-Jeou (馬英九) is considering the recommendations of the opposition, Democratic Progressive Party Sunday, February 22.

(Photo, courtesy of E-Taiwan News)  Democratic Progressive Party Chairwoman, Tsai Ing-Wen joined a prep-session on for Taiwan Citizen Conference on National Affairs.  Tsai has invited President Ma to attend the conference, however, have been reported absent from the two-day conference.

(Photo, courtesy of E-Taiwan News) Democratic Progressive Party Chairwoman, Tsai Ing-Wen joined a prep-session on for Taiwan Citizen Conference on National Affairs. Tsai has invited President Ma to attend the conference, however, have been reported absent from the two-day conference.

Presidential Spokesman, Wang Yu-Chi (王郁琦) calls the opposition’s recommendation, one of harsh planning.  The two day meeting consisted talks in wake of its “National Policy Conference” with opposition Chairwoman, Tsai Ing-Wen (蔡英文).  Tsai referred to the President as being “out of touch” with the public, hence the call to the meeting.

>>>For Tsai’s report on the May 25, 2001’s Conference, please direct through here.  <<<

Wang describes the situation, “The President certainly attaches importance to decisions taken at such a meeting…

“So long as they are good and constructive, they will be taken under consideration when policies are being laid down.  “

The Spokesman specified that the government welcomes recommendations in the idea of improvising the comprehensive economic cooperation in the Cross Strait.  This may be the next open, follow-up meeting, if included with the Legislative Yuan, the people (maximum allowed simultaneous view is 800) will be able to view the conference.

One Step To Cooperation:

The two-day held National Policy Conference is one huge step for either parties, and should be widely applauded by the people.

(Photo, credited to CNA)  Chairwoman Tsai Ing-Wen of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party told a press conference yesterday that DPP lawmakers will steer the legislative topics during the new legislative session that will open Feb. 20.

(Photo, courtesy of CNA) Chairwoman Tsai Ing-Wen of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party told a press conference yesterday that DPP lawmakers will steer the legislative topics during the new legislative session, open February 20.

In comparison, the United States holds three parties: Republican (1854), Democratic (1828 current, 1792 traditional) and Individual (Libertarian Party [1971], Constitution Party [1992], Green Party [1996], i.e.).  In general, however, despite which side a running candidate may be on, their ideal image of policies and nation-building construction derive from political mixture.  Only through this observation, unity and acceptance can politics boost the national economy.

Reviewing: The Chairwoman was sent, in response to the National Policy Conference, a one-on-one sit down meeting with the President to listen to the side of the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT), as according to Spokesman Wang, would only be fair.

>>>Kuomintang’s (KMT) take on the situation.  <<<

Tsai has declined the invitation, however still pushing the open invitation.

Opposition party, DPP held the conference to review the President’s decision, policies and effect on the nation since his inauguration.  In conclusion, the opposition demands to receive appology in failure to meet his promise, and in effect, demands an impeachment and immediate Cabinet reshuffle.

>>>On February 21, Chairwoman Tsai demands that President Ma, for the sake of Taiwan’s economy, to switch Premiers.  <<<

The Cabinet:

In a concluding speech, Tsai protests in stating that the President chose not to face the “realities” (of the public opinion, nor current state of the nation and economy), instead, chose to rush relations with China in signing a Comprehensive Economic Cooperation Arrangement (or CECA) with their capital, Beijing.

1.  The Possibility of Taiwan under CECA

2.  The Framework of the CECA

3.  Free Trade in Taiwan must continue

4.  The economic issue.

There are many who worry, that if signed, that the consequences for Taiwan may follow in a similar economic situation as Hong Kong, subordinate to Beijing.  (Website contains video)

“We demand Ma apologize and reshuffle the Cabinet,” said Tsai, during the closing ceremony, co-sponsored with the Taiwan Solidarity Union (or TSU, created by former President, Lee Teng-Hui (李登輝), which concluded with his banishment from the KMT party during his presidential term).

(Photo, courtesy of CNA)  Tsai Ing-Wen, Chairwoman of the Democratic Progressive Party (right), shakes hands with Taiwan Solidarity Union Chairman, Huang Kun-Hui.  A two-day National Policy Conference, co-sponsored by the two parties, have reached a conclusion Sunday, February 22.

(Photo, courtesy of CNA) Tsai Ing-Wen, Chairwoman of the Democratic Progressive Party (right), shakes hands with Taiwan Solidarity Union Chairman, Huang Kun-Hui. A two-day "National Policy Conference," co-sponsored by the two parties, have reached a conclusion Sunday, February 22.

Tsai suggests that at least three Cabinet Ministers (Yin Chi-Ming (尹啟銘), Minister of Economic Affairs; Lee Sush-Der (李述德), Minister of Finance; and Chen Ching-Hsiou (陳清秀), Director-General of the Central Personnel Administration) must resign.

Ten conclusions were reached, of which the Chairwoman says is first of a trio of her National Policy Conferences.

The second conference will occur between the months of April and May, while the third and final conference will be arranged sometime in 2010.  All arrived conclusions were of repetition of platitudes save the broadside fired at the KMT administration.

“Such relations (between Taiwan and China) have to be conducted with perfect transparency” urged Tsai.

“A CECA isn’t a simple economic issue…

It involves the exercise of sovereignty by an independent state.

She believes that there is no possibility in separating the economy from politics, in reference to the Taiwan Strait.

“The Ma government should first propose a comprehensive review of Taiwan’s political economic relationship (prior to the signing of the CECA).”  directed Tsai.

Huang Kun-Hui (黃昆輝), in participation of the conference, is TSU’s Chairwoman.

Huang refers the former President, Lee, as the party’s spiritual leader – and would initiate Ma’s recall upon signing the CECA.

Presidents Ma and Lee, however, was *missing from participation. Despite their absence, however, both chairpersons considered the meeting a success.  Its initial mission was to gather in reaching an overview of President Ma’s actions, and in effect, what conclusions should be reached.

A needed consensus was reached, the Chairpersons oversaw the conduct of Cross Strait economic and trade relations, and lastly, launched a political social reform.


The Impeachment:

According to Chairwoman Tsai, knowingly though pushing an impeachment on the President may fall through, it would still serve it’s point: the government needs to review the Cross Strait policies.

(Photo, courtesy of TAIPEI TIMES, by Wang Min-Wei)  Interior Minister, Lioa Liou-Yi (left), declines an invitation to sit among the VIP attendees to the Taiwan Citizen Conference on National Affairs in Taipei, Sunday, February 22.

(Photo, courtesy of TAIPEI TIMES, by Wang Min-Wei) Interior Minister, Lioa Liou-Yi (left), declines an invitation to sit among the VIP attendees to the Taiwan Citizen Conference on National Affairs in Taipei, Sunday, February 22.

DPP heavyweights Sunday, agreed in launching an impeachment drive against the President, in effect upon signing the CECA with China, without reaching a public consensus.

Chairman Huang explains, “If the Ma government does not change its wrong-headed policies and thinking, especially its wish to sign a CECA with China and allow Chinese students to study in Taiwan’s schools, we will gather all the public power available to us to oppose him an an impeachment drive against Ma may be unavoidable.”

>>>Ma’s reasoning behind his actions and determination, “Ma’s China Fantasy, Taiwan’s Realities.”  <<<

Chinese President, Hu Jin-Tao (胡錦濤) conducted a speech, in celebration of the 30th Anniversary of Beijing’s “open letter to Taiwanese compatriots” from December 31, 2008 was conducted in favour of the CECA under the “one China” principle.  Hu sees this as an important step towards “re-unification” with China, if Taiwan accepts the political conditions and signs the agreement.

Huang debates the issue with various polls, revealing that 60% to 70% of the Taiwanese public opposes the unification, and further stating that Ma’s government is ignoring the public, his Presidential responsibilities – if he allows this to continue on its path.

Su Tseng-Chang (蘇貞昌) is the opposition party’s former Chairman.

Su criticized the Ma Administration: it had “found the wrong doctors” in attempt to “cure” the current state of economy.  He explains further that if in signing the CECA, it would not be helpful to Taiwan, and considering the public opinion, the current economic and financial state – would be highly inappropriate.

Su declares the opposition parties and the public taking the matter to the streets if the proposal goes through.

Tsai concurs and warns the danger it would involve with the delicate political issues which would cause serious social conflict, if the proposal is carried through without the people’s approval.

The Chairwoman believes that the government would pay a hefty price in the launch of the impeachment drive, let alone how the President have to deal with the people.

Presidential Office: Sunday, the office of the President dismissed the alarming concerns of the opposition party (as a step towards unification) and insists that the government would consider the nation’s interests as a priority, in relations with China.

Spokesman Wang defends, “A CECA would be signed with a ‘Taiwan centric‘ premise in mind and the President’s ‘Three Noes‘ policy remains unchanged.”

The ‘Three Noes’ are in relation to Ma’s promise to the people: no unification, no independence, and no use of force.  This policy, is carried down from former President Chen Shui-Bian‘s inauguration speech, ‘Four Noes and One Without.’

>>>Important Documents on the Government’s Mainland Policy, by: The Mainland Affairs Council, The Executive Yuan, and the Republic of China – on September 2006.  <<<

>>>Former President Chen on the National Unification Council, (NUC).  <<<

However, in a separate event, Wang had spoken with the Washington Post published on Saturday suggesting that the CECA “represents an important step toward the possibility of unification of the longtime adversaries.”

>>>Washington Post interview with former President Chen.  <<<

There is a major conflict with his words, what is really going behind the deals regarding the Taiwan Strait?

Li Fei (李非) is Deputy-Director of the Taiwan Studies Centre (< website in Traditional Chinese) at Xia-Men University (< website in English).

Li was quoted in the same article (Washingtom Post) as considering the agreement to be a promising and historicmilestone.”

“It’s a start toward full cross-strait economic integration and a necessary condition for marching forward toward final unification.”  quoted the article.

The defending Presidential Spokesman, speaking on behalf of the Ma Administration, refers to the agreement as a peaceful attempt to seek a reasonable framework for the normalization of cross-strait economic and trade relations.  In regarding on taking initiative in following a public, social consensus, Wang says the government would seek such actions and the government is keen to stay with the ‘Three Noes’ policy.

Sunday, according to the Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA), the signing of the agreement would be solely based on the frameworks of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

>>>WTO and the Cross-Strait Relations.  <<<

A Repeated History:

Even during Ma’s Mayorship (Taipei City) was there an attempt to impeach his position.  One instance says it all.

On February 2006, Canadian preservationist, Curtis Smith, filed a motion with the Control Yuan to impeach the mayor (Ma) and other city officials (here is an example from a past experience, just last month), in dispute over their re-development plan for the 44 South Village (四四南村), a decaying area, built during the early KMT occupation of Taiwan (estimated 50 ago).

>>>Can historic buildings be brought back to life? <<<

(Photo, courtesy of Taiwan Review)  Two neighbouring military dependents villages in Taoyuan County designated for reconstruction.

(Photo, courtesy of Taiwan Review, by Felix Lee) Two neighbouring military dependents' villages in Taoyuan County designated for reconstruction.

In such, Smith formed a group, “Alliance to Make 44 South Village a National Relic” (or 四四南村國家古蹟促進聯盟), believed that the Taipei City should restore the 10 buildings that remain in the village.

“At present, there is not one single relic in the entire Hsinyi area,” Smith continues, “[In Taipei,] they have a way of destroying the defining characteristic of a place.”

Former residents joined the case for restoration on historical grounds.

Former villager, Hsu Cheng-Hu, says, “What culture does Taiwan have left? Nothing.

“Our Presidential mansion is left over from the Japanese occupation.  There are traces of the English, the Portuguese and the Dutch around the island, but there is almost nothing that represents Taiwan history.”

Hsu is firm in his belief in preserving Taiwan’s history culture and identity.

Hsu continues in his debate, “In Germany, they preserved the concentration camps.

“I want our children and grandchildren to see the hard life of the Mainlanders after they came over from China.”

In conclusion, the Taipei City Government agreed with the preservationist group, however, only to a certain extent.

Taipei City Hall‘s plan called for the restoration in four of the 10 buildings, and the demolition of the outer six, to construct a local park.

Historic Site: According to the Ministry of National Defense (MDN), there had been a total of 888 military dependents’ villages, many of which were located within urban areas.  Over 200 in Taipei City when the ROC (Nationalist) troops and their dependents withdrew from China to Taiwan.

Upon their arrival, they’ve moved their military bases and families into local homes.  The Japanese had built some dormitories for their troops (during their Colonization Era), but there were not enough to accommodate everyone.  Instead, the majority of the Senior Officers had taken residence and other dependents were forced to make tents, sleep in quiet corners of temple courtyards or within abandoned warehouses.  The hardship lead the Nationalist army to build family quarters – that of which is 44 South Village, among others.

The Plan: Taiwan’s National Legislature passed the Statute Governing Reconstruction of Old Military Dependents’ Villages (國軍老舊眷村改建條例) in 1996 to upgrade poor conditioned or abandoned housings for redevelopment of modern, high-rise housing.

This held a controversy.  What was once an approximate 900 island-scattered Nationalist villages, only 140 remained.  The Mainland Chinese communities choose to buy new government-subsidized housing, or accept a compensation package for relocation.

As Taipei grows and outspreads its city limits, the number of Chinese are decreasing as they are force to abandon what they have called home for two generations.

The decision runs deeper than the urban mixed emotions, it is political.  The [then] President Lee Teng-Hui pursued a policy of localization, the reason: it works efficiently as a ploy in preventing veterans [and their families] from voting for the New Party, which had separated from the KMT over Lee’s controversial “Taiwan-first” agenda.

Chang Mao-Kuei (張茂桂) is President of the Association of Mainlander Taiwanese (外省臺灣人協會), and Sociologist at the Academica Sinica.

It was a numbers game.

“They inflated the numbers to make whoever proposed the amendment look bad,” while “the people who proposed [the additional amendments] could not” explain why they were called for, nor explained the budget.

“To my knowledge, some of those veterans may have already received housing subsidies for not living in Juan-Cun.”  explains Chang.

Chang continues to say that the original amdendment as in advantage of the bi-partisan suppport, “… Our intention was just to preserve the cultural memory.”

>>>TAIPEI TIMES wrote here, an article after President Ma’s [then] mayorship, “How Did He Do In Office?”  <<<

Advertisements

~ by Lan on 2008 MonUTC2009-02-23T16:48:27+00:00. 15.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: