Even the Japanese Are Doing It!

The Japanese Never Age:

(Photo, courtesy of daylife)  Tomoko Ohara eats cooked Japanese eel on a rice at an eel restaurant Yaotoku in Tokyo July 26, 2007. Many Japanese eat vitamin-rich eel in summer to bolster their stamina after days of heat-enervated appetites, especially so on Eel Day -- formally known as Doyo no Ushi no Hi -- on July 30, a date determined by the ancient solar calendar and believed to be the hottest of the year. Eel aficionados -- who devour broiled eels in a bid to beat the heat.

(Photo, courtesy of daylife) Tomoko Ohara eats cooked Japanese eel on a rice at an eel restaurant 'Yaotoku' (website in Japanese) in Tokyo July 26, 2007. Many Japanese eat vitamin-rich eel in summer to bolster their stamina after days of heat-enervated appetites, especially so on Eel Day -- formally known as "Doyo no Ushi no Hi" -- on July 30, a date determined by the ancient solar calendar and believed to be the hottest of the year. Eel aficionados -- who devour broiled eels in a bid to beat the heat.

This little secret habit-made-diet reduces wrinkles, prevents blemishes and tightens skin – as so it claims!  No uncomfortable plastic surgery, no deadly botox injections or daily massages.  The answer derives from something so much simpler and best of all: it is natural. 

COLLAGEN!  It grows in animals’ connective tissue, the main protein.  This assists in strengthening blood vessels and connective tissues, in simpler terms: it is a cheat-sheet for your health.  The scientific description: it is a fibrous, structural protein which gives strength to tissues – hence the ageless appeal (strength and elasticity in skin). 

The structural protein itself, aka the collagen, is strong: collagen is the main component of cartilage, ligaments, tendons, bones and teeth – you can find it anywhere. 

 

And They Keep Biting:

(Murray) eel fishing.

(Murray) eel fishing.

Why would anyone throw away a decent share of collagen, the key diet to slow down the ageing process?  The muraenid eel (or moray eel) family, or more commonly known as the “money eel” in Mandarin, is prized for its long body, full of collagen composites.  Accepted within the practice of Chinese medicine, recommends brewed as a stew, hilighting its natural richness and tender texture. 

In the past, this collagen feast has been disregarded as a hassle for fisherman, for they are known for biting the fishing line (even past its death), ending up as capture in their fishing.  Disregarded and unrecognized for their benefits, the eels were sold for NTD $10 per kilo, compared to today’s market price of NTD $200 per kilogram. 

 

What’s In A Bite?

(Photo, courtesy of daylife)  Kuo Chou-In, president of Taiwan Eel Farming Industry Development Foundation displays a live eel, imported from Taiwan, during a press conference for the promotion of Taiwanese eels, at a Tokyo hotel on July 18, 2008. With the upcoming eel-eating day in Japan on July 24, eel restaurants and shops are hoping to have their record sales of the year.

(Photo, courtesy of daylife) Kuo Chou-In, president of Taiwan Eel Farming Industry Development Foundation (website in traditional Chinese) displays a live eel, imported from Taiwan, during a press conference for the promotion of Taiwanese eels, at a Tokyo hotel on July 18, 2008. With the upcoming eel-eating day in Japan on July 24, eel restaurants and shops are hoping to have their record sales of the year.

These moray eels are known for being a nocturnal creature, dwelling along the reefs, generally hunting fishes and crustations that hide along the corals and rocks.  Oddly enough, this creature hunts through its sense of smell, while some are known to use the knotting method to break-off larger preys.  They can pick-up and swallow [smaller] preys (within 25% of the mass weight and size) with one single movement, and all without having to chew. 

Perhaps, what can be said for the impressive amount of collagen throughout almost the entire length of the body, is their remarkable 42 digestive tracts.  Being nocturnal, they remain hidden and stationary during the day (sensitive to white light) while at night, they may tend to depart [temporarily] from shelter for hunting, varying on the environment (60% were documented to have actually left from their place of shelter). 

 

Collagen At Work:

(Photo, courtesy of itd.clrc.ac.uk)  The structure of a collagen.

(Photo, courtesy of itd.clrc.ac.uk) The structure of a collagen.

How exactly does collagen work?  So far, we understand that our very own immune system is capable of repairing itself from minor infections, injuries, viruses, etc.  Are we able to grasp the idea? 

Dr. Ronald D. G. McKay, experienced in the field of neural stem cells at the National Institute of Health, explains how he believes that the body’s tissues are “self assembling” once its source (or stem cells) are given the right cues. 

“I don’t know how to make a heart,” Dr. McKay says.  “But once you know how to take stem cells and turn them into heart muscle, it’s easy.” 

What goes on in your body: the cell-to-cell signaling system.  The body, in its 100 trillion cells self, dictate the system through transmitting chemical signals to influence behaviour of other like cells, simultaneously receiving other signals through special receptors embedded within its surface. 

These cells are called interleukins, produced by the white blood cells and erythropoetin (the blood cell-stimulating protein).

Unfortunately, the horror is that we lose collagen at the rate of 1.5% a year.  This means that by age of 60, we have lost over 50% of the collagen we had at 25. 

This is the sole reason why it is important to increase collagen count in our bodies, not to mention that it connects and supports skin, bone, tendons, muscles, internal organs, teeth and cartilage (you may notice some people taking dosages of shark cartilage).  No wonder it is in such a high demand!  Without it: our body would literally, fall apart

 

One More, Please!

(Photo, courtesy of CNA)  Yin Ling, who is active in the Japanese entertainment industry, displays a certificate declaring her “Taiwan’s eel ambassador” in Tokyo Friday, October 24, 2008.

(Photo, courtesy of CNA) Yin Ling, who is active in the Japanese entertainment industry, displays a certificate declaring her “Taiwan's eel ambassador” in Tokyo Friday, October 24, 2008.

Collagen was found up to 45% in eels, most found throughout the skin as well as scales, bone and fin.  Total collagen in their organs franged from 76.2% of “whole body collagen” (Japanese eel) to 91.1% (red sea bream).  The high the content of the white muscle (as opposed to viscera), the greater the percentage of collagen. 

The role of aquaculture, remaining as Taiwan’s 1/3 of total seafood production, the most prized farmed fish is still indeed the eel ranging from 26,000 to 56,000 metric tons anually.  Eelfarming can be traced back in the island, to 1958 (while the experimentation of this, originally occurred in 1952).  Naturally, it has become a popular seafood demand in the Taiwanese cuisine and brought great profit to the island by exporting (90%) to Japan (reports show that the Japanese consume up to 100,000 tons per year), where it is in high demand. 

In particular, the unagi is a source of a variety of vitamins such as A, B, D and E – which combined, works as effective agents for rejuvenating the body.  A diet of eel is a great benefit to one’s health as it has been documented to decrease cholesterol, lower blood pressure, prevent vascular diseases, reduces risk of developing arthritis, reduce type 2 diabetes (among certain groups – due to the high omega 3 content), promotes normal brain development and function within the nervous system and eyesight. 

There is every reason to break out into this snake-like fish, one can say good bye to Cheerio’s!

Advertisements

~ by Lan on 2008 WedUTC2009-02-11T22:27:16+00:00. 15.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: