A Sheep Painted Panda

December 31, 2008 passed, is recognized and celebrated as the 30th anniversary of the adoption of China’s “peaceful reunification” policy for Taiwan.  A statement was issued by China’s President, Hu Jin-Tao, renewing the call for the Taiwan Strait to negotiate under the “One China” principle, in hopes to end the long endured hostile relations.

Chinese president Hu Jintao makes a speech during a ceremony to mark the 30th anniversary of economic reform at The Great Hall of the People on December 18, 2008 in Beijing, China. On this date in 1978, at the third plenary session of the 11th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping agreed to began a series of economic changes called Reform and Opening Up, which have seen the country develop into one of the worlds largest economies.

BEIJING - DECEMBER 18, 2008 : Chinese president Hu Jin-Tao makes a speech during a ceremony to mark the 30th anniversary of economic reform at The Great Hall of the People today ( Dec. 18, 2008 ) in Beijing, China. On this date in 1978, at the third plenary session of the 11th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, Chinese leader Deng Xiao-Ping agreed to began a series of economic changes called Reform and Opening Up, which have seen the country develop into one of the world's largest economies.

What has happened?

Does it appear that China has been the one giving all the offers and Taiwan simply ignores them?  Or is it the other way around?  Or is there just a lack of communication.

>>>Recommended read: 106th CONGRESS 1st Session: Expressing the sense of the Congress that the United States should adopt a One China, One Taiwan Policy which reflects the present day reality that Taiwan and China are two separate nations.<<<

Recent events:

i.) (Personal note, excuse my personal feelings on this one.)  The nation receives a new President, one who is not a Taiwanese native, but is of Hakka blood, born in Hong Kong, educated under the KMT system in Taiwan and raised by his mainland Chinese family.  He may hold Taiwanese citizenship, but how dare he calls himself Taiwanese!!

1.) The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) has attempted peaceful talks with the Chinese government, however, to no avail.  The request was denied.

2.) President Hu Jin-Tao accepts President Ma Ying-Jeou‘s offer on peaceful negotiations in China.

3.) First time in half a century was there a peaceful-talk for the Taiwan Strait, however there was still no set conclusion: each side has their own ideas.

4.) China still offers their “One China” policy and Taiwan reflects over the situations in Hong Kong, Tibet and Singapore.

5.) Taiwan receives gift of good will, the two large Pandas from Szechuan Province of China.

6.) The Taiwanese public’s fever for the new arrivals spread, the political tension is currently on pause.

Are we really so easily tempted, to be diverted by these “gifts?”  The one question I want to ask every single one of you reading this right now: Are the pandas a better gift of “good will” for Taiwan as opposed to, say, a reduction of the thousands of missiles pointed dead-on Taiwan…??  Talk about hostile!

We all obviously know what Taiwan’s idea of peace is: internationally recognized as an independent nation with separate rule and government from China, or in simpler terms, independence.

What is China’s idea of peace? For Taiwan…

Hu’s six-point overture dicates that the one Chinaprinciple remains Beijing’s bottom line; a principle which the capital refuses to ever even budge one single inch, explains Chao Chien-Min, vice chairman of the Mainland Affairs Council (MAC).

Chao, in turn, suggests the political basis in promoting peaceful unification, should rest on the concept that “both the mainland and Taiwan belong to one China.”  President Hu further comments on the idea, proposing closer economic cooperation (currently, economic exchange and agriculture trade has been in effect) and “reasonable arrangements” to address Taiwan into international organizations.

>>>Personal note:  For a detailed time-line on exactly what happened since one century ago (Sun Yat-Sen), I strongly suggest you take a view at a site I have hyper-linked into this personal note.<<<

Chao referred to Hu’s six-point overture as to be a major plank in shaping China’s policies toward Taiwan in the future.  He recalls Hu’s predecessor, Jiang Ze-Min having created the eight point-proposal (based on the cross-strait relations) in 1995, which was easily ignored – and eventually forgotten.

“It’s only a matter of time before the ‘Hu six-point overture’ is written into the charters of the Communist Party of China, ” Chao predicts.

>>> Personal note: does this mean to say, that China, in order to “unify Taiwan,” is willing to change their government in order to allow desired proceedings???  If so, what happened with Hong Kong: One China, Two Systems?  It may be so, on paper, but what really goes on, you can imagine for yourself.  Remember Singapore?<<<

(Photo, courtesy of Xinhua)  Chinese President Hu Jintao addresses a ceremony commemorating the 30th anniversary of the announcement of Message to Compatriots in Taiwan, held in Beijing, capital of China, on Dec. 31, 2008. The Chinese mainland commemorated the 30th anniversary of the announcement of Message to Compatriots in Taiwan here Wednesday with a ceremony.

(Photo, courtesy of Xinhua) Chinese President Hu Jintao addresses a ceremony commemorating the 30th anniversary of the announcement of Message to Compatriots in Taiwan, held in Beijing, capital of China, on Dec. 31, 2008. The Chinese mainland commemorated the 30th anniversary of the announcement of Message to Compatriots in Taiwan here Wednesday with a ceremony.

TheSix Point Overture” from Hu’s speech are as follows:

1) firm adherence to the ‘one China’ principle

2) strengthening commercial ties, including negotiating an economic cooperation agreement

3) promoting personnel exchanges

4) stressing common cultural links between the two sides

5) allowing Taiwan’s ‘reasonable’ participation in global organizations

6) negotiating a peace agreement

The  initial response to the overture (January 1, 2009), the Presidential Office applauded on the “new mindset and pragmatism” of the Chinese authorities, however stressed the thought as “a pluralistic society.”  The Taiwanese people are greatly unique in many, but among one, is their diverse view on the future, political views and expressions – that must be respected.

The Presidential Office brought up the “1992 Consensus, ” stating how the consensus allows Taipei and Beijing to “agree to disagree” on the terms of “One China. ”  The principle of “mutual non-denial” holds a reminder to the Chinese, Taiwan’s stance on their relations, it is very clear.

>>>I must add here, a quote from the president.gov.tw website on the 1992 Consensus.  Thus, during the term of former President, Lee Teng-Hui.<<<

Lee Teng-Hui on the issue at hand:

President Lee Teng-Hui waves to the roar of the cheering crowds as he makes it to his inauguration.  Together in one gathered mass, they all joined in celebration of the Taiwanese identity and independence.

President Lee Teng-Hui waves to the roar of the cheering crowds as he makes it to his inauguration. Together in one gathered mass, they all joined in celebration of the Taiwanese identity and independence.

On the “one China” question, President Lee said that the 1972 Shanghai Communique between Washington and Peking clearly states: “The United States acknowledges that all Chinese on both sides of the Taiwan Strait maintain that there is but one China and Taiwan is a part of China.”  Afterwards each side claimed itself as representing China.  However, Peking now maintains that “one China” means the People’s Republic of China and that Taiwan is a province of it, a position which the ROC cannot accept, he said.

“We contend that ‘one China’ refers to a unified Chinese nation which is democratic and free,” the President said.  “National unification has been a non-negotiable goal for the government and people of the ROC, but it is unlikely for us to pursue this goal at the expense of renouncing the Republic of China.”

Further explaining to Mr. Gingrich and other delegation members the denotation of “one China”, the President asserted that the term should allow for different interpretations, and by the ROC’s definition, “one China” means a unified China characterized by freedom, democracy and equitable distribution of wealth.  “We can never agree with Peking to regard Taiwan as a province of it,” he added.

President Lee pointed out that, since becoming a member of the UN, Peking has insisted that the Taiwan issue is an internal matter and that no third country should interfere in its domestic politics.  Many countries have gradually accepted this rhetoric as a result of such persistence from Peking, thereby unjustifiably excluding Taiwan from joining the international community, let alone the United Nations, the President said.

January 6, 2009, President Ma suggests Taiwan to learn the connotations of the policy implications in China’s latest proposal.  March 24th, 2009, Ma made public, the possibility to boycot the Beijing Olympics, and has commented to the foreign media that he holds no future visits to China anytime soon, but set mandatory on working “substantive issues,” such as pursuing economic cooperation and in signing a peace agreement with Beijing.

>>>Read here for what former President Chen Shui-Bian has to say on the issue.<<<

(Photo, courtesy of CNA, dated January 2, 2009)  Wang Yu-chi, spokesman for President Ma Ying-jeou, reiterates the importance of the consensus of 1992. He called a hasty press conference yesterday to respond to Chinese President Hu Jintaos Six Points of Taiwan policy.

(Photo, courtesy of CNA, dated January 2, 2009) Wang Yu-Chi, spokesman for President Ma Ying-jeou, reiterates the importance of the consensus of 1992. He called a hasty press conference yesterday to respond to Chinese President Hu Jintao's "Six Points" of Taiwan policy.

Conclusion:

The Ma administration has requested the economics to take precedence over the current politics and stressed the island’s wish to engage in international organizations.

Professor Tsai Wei of the Chinese Culture University‘s Sun Yat-sen Graduate Institute, shared from Hu’s overture, it is obvious: China has not, and will never adjust or retaliate its “one-China” principle.

“Hu’s proposals could at best be viewed as a change in the way Beijing is articulating its ‘one-China’ principle.”  Tsai continues, “Hu’s call for both sides to open up ‘international space,’ end cross-strait hostilities and build mutual trust could be seen as new approach that nonetheless still lacks concrete, positive action, ” Tsai contended.

From brookings.edu, I would like to quote a passage on this “international space.”

That hope was not realized.  Within Taiwan, there was insufficient consensus over the goals of its Mainland and external policy.  The PRC resisted Taiwan’s effort to gain more international space.  And there was disagreement between Beijing and Taipei over the sovereignty issue, not only as it applied to Taiwan’s role in the international system but also with respect to cross-Strait relations.  Because of these factors, each side believed increasingly that the other threatened its fundamental interests (whether that was true or not), and each adopted policies based on those fears.  China built up its military to deter, in its view, a separatist scheme.  Taiwan leaders intensified claims of sovereignty as a defense, as they saw it, against PRC domination.  The result was a spiral of mutual insecurity and militarization.

To each side, they are right and there should not be any adjustment to what has already and have done to preserve the rights of the people.  Basically, in sum of all these words, quotes, speeches and policies: Countries should maintain their own order and government, without interfering cross-water affairs.

Advertisements

~ by Lan on 2008 SunUTC2009-02-01T16:58:41+00:00. 15.

One Response to “A Sheep Painted Panda”

  1. […] A Sheep Painted Panda Tags: chen-shui-bian, Culture, Events, jiang-ze-min, News, people, Politics, president, […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: