A Single Heartbeat

The Fall of the Plan for Democracy

The new name of the Taipei landmark memorial honoring the late dictator Chiang Kai-shek is seen at the base of the structure after Taiwans Chen Shui-bian renamed it during an afternoon ceremony, Saturday May 19, 2007, in Taipei, Taiwan. Chen Shui-bians decision to change the name from The Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall to The National Taiwan Democracy Memorial Hall to commemorate democracy activists comes amid a continuing government campaign to belittle Chiangs memory in the run-up to Taiwans 2008 presidential elections.

The new name of the Taipei landmark memorial honoring the late dictator Chiang Kai-shek is seen at the base of the structure after Taiwan's Chen Shui-bian renamed it during an afternoon ceremony, Saturday May 19, 2007, in Taipei, Taiwan. Chen Shui-bian's decision to change the name from "The Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall" to "The National Taiwan Democracy Memorial Hall" to commemorate democracy activists comes amid a continuing government campaign to belittle Chiang's memory in the run-up to Taiwan's 2008 presidential elections.

2007: The DPP government denounced the memorial title as an effort in reshaping monuments and renaming national and historical sites commemorating the former dictator, Chiang Kai-Shek (蔣介石) many have frowned upon, reciting Taiwan’s history and struggle for national identity and education since Sun Yat-Sen‘s arrival to the island.

The move, as predicted, was condemned by the opposition party’s (KMT) dominated legislature.  The change in the name plaque led to tighter conflicts between the two political parties and protesting public voices and demonstrations.

August 21, 2008: Following the uprise in KMT rule in May, Premier Liu Chao-Shiuan (劉兆玄) instructed the Executive Yuan, he was directed to withdraw the former DPP administration’s request to abolish the Organic Act of the CKS Memorial Hall and scrap the Organic Regulations of the National Taiwan Democracy Memorial Hall.

January 25, 2009: The Presidential Office defends the government’s conclusion in retrieving the title of the National Taiwan Democracy Memorial Hall back to Chiang Kai-Shek (CKS) Memorial Hall as is currently recognized, even in MRT maps and station.

January 28, 2009: the Ministry of Education formalized the plan to reinstate the name CKS Hall by the end of July 2009.

Vice Minister of Education Lu Mu-Lin (呂木琳) reported that the ministry had continued with the decision without holding a public forum for discussion and overview, as led to believe by Minister of Education Cheng Jei-Cheng (鄭瑞城) in August 2008.

January 30, 2009: A letter published by China Times, Yun-Lin County Deputy Commissioner Lee Ying-Yuan (李應元) dismissed the decision, commenting the peculiar rush in the change of title, as “hasty.”

Lee refers to the President, Ma Ying-Jeou (馬英九) as one lacking the “breadth of mind” that the U.S. President, Barack Obama had shown in resolving political conflicts and suggested the Taiwan President to take into consideration as an ideal example in gaining public confidence.

In a press release, Presidential Office Spokesman Wang Yu-Chi (王郁琦) responded that the responsibility to reinstate the hall’s original title is in the hands of the government.  Wang continued by stating the move by the former administration in the change of title through administrative order of the Legislative Yuan, is consequently “illegal,” according to the Organic Act of the CKS Memorial Hall (中正紀念堂組織條例).  In short, in retrieving the formal title is to cancel-out the illegal move (during the former President’s term) and pay homage to one of Taiwan’s most recognized historical leaders.

An administrative order cannot override a law,” Wang said, reminding that it was a fundamental principle in a society ruled by law, hence the government’s duty in defending the law and restoring the Memorial Hall to its former title.

Controversial Innocence, at Play:

In this Nov. 17, 2008 file photo, Taiwans former President Chen Shui-bian is transferred to the Taipei County Hospital from the Far Eastern Memorial Hospital for better care facilities in Taipei County, Taiwan. In a poetic lament written in his Taiwanese jail cell and was published in Taiwanese newspapers on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008, hunger-striking Chen has hinted he is willing to die for his pro-independence, anti-China beliefs.

In this Nov. 17, 2008 file photo, Taiwan's former President Chen Shui-bian is transferred to the Taipei County Hospital from the Far Eastern Memorial Hospital for better care facilities in Taipei County, Taiwan. In a poetic lament written in his Taiwanese jail cell and was published in Taiwanese newspapers on Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008, hunger-striking Chen has hinted he is willing to die for his pro-independence, anti-China beliefs.

January 26, 2009: Chen Shui-Bian stood his ground in his plea of “not guilty“ to all charges, repeatedly having stressed that decisions on the government land procurements were decided by the Executive Yuan and not the Office of the President.  Chen further claims his support had no power in the final decisions on the project, which initially, was “for the benefit of the economy.“  (Doesn’t this sound familiar as to what President Ma is doing?)

January 20, 2009: The offense of “intending to profit“ in advantage of Chen’s official position in legal codes for salient reasons that his intentions are virtually impossible to bring to light “beyond a shadow of a doubt,“ without risking exposure of government official, agency at the central or local levels involved.

The result is likely to be bureaucratic paralysis which could further erode the efficiency of implementation of government policies and public infrastructure projects.  In simpler terms, there would be no change in political actions as oppose to the labeled corruption charges since all politics are involved in this matter, varying on the degree of exposure.

The shift from the charge of “bribery“ to the recent ones, hints at the necessity to secure a conviction despite possible and awaiting damages to the credibility of Taiwan’s legal system, or in pulling the economy out of recession.  The risk reinstates the question if the motivation was a commitment to bring light on impartial truths and justice, or political vengeance against the former President for “rimes“ of disturbing KMT’s continuous rule over the island.  It is a fight between two tigers with hidden motivations that only misleads us, the public, from the truth of the matter.

Tainted Red:

(Photo, couresty of TAIPEI TIMES, by GEORGE TSORNG)  Presidential Office Secretary-General Mark Chen gestures yesterday while commenting on recent accusations leveled against first lady Wu Shu-jen. Chen said Wu had not received any inappropriate gifts from anyone.

(Photo, couresty of TAIPEI TIMES, by GEORGE TSORNG) Presidential Office Secretary-General Mark Chen gestures yesterday while commenting on recent accusations leveled against first lady Wu Shu-jen. Chen said Wu had not received any inappropriate gifts from anyone.

January 28, 2009: Former President’s son and daughter-in-law pleads guilty in the Taipei District Court hearing on members of the former first family on money-laundering charges.

Chen Chih-Chung and wife, Huang Jui-Ching acted as the proxy and nominal holder, respectively, of the family’s bank accounts.

We will earn our own living.  We hope that society will accept us,” said Chen after the hearing.

Prior to the remark, the 30-year-old offered his apology to the public for the turmoil of recent events and having reversibly demoralized the trust and public view of the DPP party.  In the hearing, the couple agreed to the equivalent of NT$570 million remitted to Taiwan, however it remains unclear on how the transfer shall proceed.

Prosecutors declined to confirm if the couple may have released signed, authorization letters to which allow them to scrutinize their Swiss bank accounts and having the agreed amount returned.

December 18, 2008: In the deposition, the couple indicated a compromise to discuss a plea bargain and allowing the alleged amount ( equivalent to: US$21 million), frozen by Swiss authorities, returned.

December 30, 2008: Chen and Huang issued a statement, detailing their assets and bank accounts, and expressed their willingness to cooperate in the investigation.

January 28, 2009: The Taipei District Court decides to subpoena former first lady, Wu Shu-Jen; a hearing has been set for February 10 – 11 to begin, what has seemed to be a dragging race to the pretrial hearings on the question of embezzlement of public funds and money-laundering cases.  Perhaps, the source of which the cases were derived, will finally give an answer and lay to rest further accusations.

Beyond Political Censorship, His Words:

Taiwanese candidates scoured the island for support Friday, January 11, 2008, on the eve of legislative elections widely seen as a referendum on President Chen Shui-bians efforts to carve out a non-Chinese identity for the self-governed island.

Taiwanese candidates scoured the island for support Friday, January 11, 2008, on the eve of legislative elections widely seen as a referendum on President Chen Shui-bian's efforts to carve out a non-Chinese identity for the self-governed island.

Taiwan’s Cross” voices discussion and evidence of various government-directed actions, such as the attempts to attract high technology investment, currently declared by prosecutors as being “favouritism“ or engaging in “secret diplomacy“ of which the KMT have engaged in decades of “checkbook diplomacy.“  The Chinese Nationalist party is ever eager to outlaw the listed, to appease Beijing and build greater diplomatic relations with the China.

Chen`s criticisms of political heavyweights such as former DPP Presidential candidate, Frank Hsieh,  and Taiwan’s Premier, Yu Shyi-Kun, whose ambitions, ego and political misjudgments, ultimately led to the humiliating defeat.  The resentful political error created “a divided DPP“ within the hands and visual uprising of  “a united KMT“ in 2008’s legislative, presidential elections, and the former president`s on-going private turmoil and snowball of accusations by the public.

Chen, self-declared advocate of the “parliamentarian“ path of political change, “struggled for 30 years, and we have shattered authoritarian dictatorship, secured a certain degree of human rights and democracy, but were unable to go through democratic procedures of self-determination to allow Taiwan to become a sovereign independent country.“

The former President discussed how China’s capital, Beijing, declined allolive branches“ offered by the DPP government, and thus declared “believing that China will make a goodwill response if Taiwan makes concessions to China, an extremely naive hallucination.“

One begs the question: Why is China favouring open-talks with current President, Ma Ying-Jeou while denying such with the opposition party??

Chen explains how the U.S. government was “blind to China`s military preparations against Taiwan,“ while continually referring to his *May 2000 inauguralfour noes and one without (四不一沒有),“ a speech of commitment as to demand the nation not step on a “red line, drawn based on the integration of U.S. and Chinese interests.“

In contrast to U.S. capital, Washington’s “strategic ambiguity, Beijing’s one China principle,“ and Ma`s misleading“mutual non-denial,“ Chen stresses the necessary first step of “first recognizing the reality of Taiwan’s independence“ as sole foundation to the exercise and put to advantage for the right of the greater 23 million Taiwanese, to decide their future.

“… A correct road to Taiwan Independence“ would revive the nation’s desire in the democratic movement`s integration of grassroots political forces and those involved in democratic political movements “outside the system“ and utilize referendum drives “to refuse unification“ with the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) – ruled China and to “join the United Nations (UN) under the name of Taiwan“ in such to hold domestic consensus into the following presidential election whose “axis,“ Chen predicts, would be the question of “a choice between Taiwan or China.“

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~ by Lan on 2008 SatUTC2009-01-31T15:22:04+00:00. 15.

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